Happening today at the Fall Dispatch Home & Garden Show – The Columbus Dispatch

The Columbus Dispatch

TODAY AT THE SHOW

Don’t miss “This Old House” host Kevin O’Connor’s virtual appearance today. He will offer advice and answer questions, plus you can also enter to win a private personal online conversation with him.

Be sure to check out all that this year’s show has to offer.

Location: DispatchHomeAndGardenShow.com

Admission: free

Hours: Show opens at 8 a.m.; chats are open through 8 p.m. Today is the last day for live virtual presentations and to chat with companies. Highlights from the show will remain online through Oct. 31.

Special attractions: The Backyard Garden Award winners will be announced at 4 p.m. 

Today’s workshops

Chat with presenters and get your specific questions answered; check online for additional workshops.

10 a.m.: SimpleBath/SimpleKitchen presentation

11 a.m: Kevin O’Connor, host of “This Old House”

Noon: How do you improve your indoor air quality?; presentation by Fire & Ice Heating and Air Conditioning

4 p.m.: Backyard Garden Awards winners’ announcement

5 p.m.: planting bulbs using the lasagna layering technique

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Plant spacing for a healthy, fire-smart garden – Marin Independent Journal

Big spaces make playing hopscotch difficult for flames.

When playing hopscotch, we learned that making big jumps is hard. In a fire-smart landscape, we want to make it hard for fire to play hopscotch in our yards. Maintaining the proper space between plants is how we make it difficult for fire to hopscotch through your property to your home or your neighbor’s home.

Plant spacing is one of many planning and maintenance best practices for both a healthy and fire-smart garden. Plants that have to compete with their neighbors for soil nutrients and sunlight are not going to be as healthy as those that receive all the nutrients they need. Proper spacing also ensures their roots will not have to compete for nutrients and water.

But, there can be too much of a good thing. Some plants require a certain number of neighbors to pollinate, so make sure that you don’t end up with too few plants. Shade from properly spaced plants can crowd out weeds as they grow and keep the soil moist, creating a beneficial environment in your garden.

In a fire-smart yard, the zero- to 5-foot zone around the perimeter of structures on your property is the most important part of an effective defensible space strategy. Minimizing combustible materials and vegetation in this zone will reduce the potential for direct flame contact and elevated radiant heat exposure that would result from ember-ignited vegetation near your home or other structures on your property. Keeping plants around the perimeter properly spaced will prevent continuity of flames. Also, separate plants with non-combustible, permeable mulch like compost, gravels or rocks of varying sizes.

In the 5- to 30-foot zone, the goal is to reduce the connectivity between garden beds, shrubs and trees, so that if something ignites in this zone, the fire will not be able to hopscotch to the house or into the crowns of trees. Prune and thin plants to reduce fuel densities and create more space between them. Creating separation between the plantings, trees and the home achieves fuel and vegetation discontinuity. The jumps are too big for flames. Prune taller vegetation to control flame heights because fire likes to play three-dimensional hopscotch.

Courtesy of GardenSoft

California native plants are well adapted to our drought-oriented climate and a preferred choice for fire-smart gardens.

A home on a steeper slope, in a windy area or an area surrounded by unusually dense, tall or combustible vegetation increases the intensity of fire behavior, making it easier for fire to hopscotch. Make the spaces bigger to slow the spread of flames.

If you remove dead trees and shrubs to create more space, leave the roots in place to help prevent erosion. If you replace plants, there are many tempting plant choices at garden centers. Be sure to research the mature height and width of plants before you make your selections. Reading the plant tag, and paying close attention to the light requirement, water needs and mature size will help inform the spacing of your new plants. Then, locate your new plants so they will be properly spaced when they mature in three to four years.

Non-combustible mulch or low-growing groundcovers can be used to fill in between the new plantings and conserve moisture while denying fire a path to your home when the new plantings mature.

A healthy and fire-smart landscape is the result of applying best gardening practices to your yard. Having a healthy landscape discourages pests on a long-term basis and will significantly reduce the need for pesticides, which often have a negative impact on our environment. And proper plant spacing makes sure your yard won’t be a playground for fire.

The University of California Marin Master Gardeners are sponsored by UC Cooperative Extension. For questions about gardening, plant pests or diseases, call 415-473-4204 from 9 a.m. to noon, and 1 to 4 p.m. weekdays, bring in samples or pictures to 1682 Novato Blvd., Suite 150B, Novato, or email helpdesk@marinmg.org.

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Giant-pumpkin growers overcome big challenges | Home and Garden | nny360.com – NNY360

HARTFORD, Conn. — Earlier this year, lifelong Plainville, Conn., resident Gary Vincent planted eight giant pumpkin seeds in an unfenced, uncovered garden plot owned by Plainville’s Our Lady of Mercy Church. Vincent, 70, began growing giant pumpkins in 1981 after his wife brought home five seeds from the Big E fair. The following year he grew a 200-pound pumpkin and a 275-pounder the year after that.

“This is when the world record was like 500 and something pounds,” he says. Last year the world record was set at 2,624.6 pounds by Mathias Willemijns of Belgium.

Of the eight seeds he planted in 2020, “How many do you think are left?” Vincent asked before pausing to answer, “zero.”

For Vincent, this year was an especially tough one for pumpkin growing because it brought the added stress of record-breaking heat and humidity, wind-damage from Tropical Storm Isaias. And, with COVID-19 social distancing requirements, many of the fairs that serve as certified weighing stations have been canceled, including Durham and Topsfield.

Vincent’s last remaining 2020 pumpkin now rests on a bed of sand, where he will take an axe to its thick walls, hoping to harvest seeds for next year.

At present, the pumpkin is estimated at 1,457 pounds, which is too small for Vincent to compete with. According to Vincent, Tropical Storm Isaias took out about 60 percent of the plant.

Last year, Vincent grew a 2,169.5 pound pumpkin that took second at the Topsfield Fair in Massachusetts. The first-place finisher was Pomfret resident Alex Noel.

The 29-year-old set a Connecticut record with a 2,294-pound pumpkin and says growing a pumpkin at these weights can require 25 hours a week in the patch. Coaxing root growth, monitoring soil and water health, making sure the wall is thick enough to support the pumpkin’s weight, setting mouse traps and fending off hungry invaders.

“It’s amazing how fragile they are when they get this big,” Noel said.

Vincent, who is a retired Bristol Police officer, says that to be a successful giant-pumpkin grower, “You gotta be retired and you gotta be crazy.”

“I’m down to the last quarter of my life,” Vincent said. “My biggest dream is one of two things, I want to get back the state record and I want to break 2,300. I want to get up to over 2,500, I wanna break the world record.”

At the end of a dirt road in Higganum, there are three giant pumpkins growing in a netted hoop house behind Ryan and Chelsea Cleveland’s house. Each fruit is surrounded by dozens of two-foot tall leaves, each looking like an upturned child-sized umbrella. Wooden planks indicate the narrow path where foot travel is allowed because any damage to the vines and roots transporting up to 100-gallons of water a day can mean precious pounds lost.

Ryan, 36, is considered relatively new to the hobby. He first competed in 2017 with a 605-pound pumpkin. But this year, Ryan may have Connecticut’s largest.

In keeping with a tradition Chelsea says all growers maintain, their pumpkins each have a name, and Mrs. McCleve is expected to weigh more than 2,000 pounds.

On Sept. 26, if Mrs. McCleve stays intact after the strain of being cut from its stem, lifted with a special harness made by Cleveland, and transported by trailer to an East Haddam weigh-in, Ryan and Chelsea will find out for sure.

The East Haddam weigh-in is being held in lieu of the canceled Durham Fair.

Two weeks before the East Haddam weigh-in, a similar event was held at the Putnam home of grower Gene Lariviere. The smallest pumpkin in that contest, grown by Lariviere, came in at 1,151 pounds. The largest pumpkin weighed in at 1,885.5-pounds and was grown by 37 year-old Matthew Dabacco.

Debacco began growing twenty years ago after seeds from a Halloween Jack-o’-Lantern sprouted in his front yard. “If they grow this easy,” he thought then, “I’m going to give it a shot.”

DeBacco says every season growing giant pumpkins is challenging. But this year’s lack of fairs, and their opportunities to show and promote giant pumpkins to newcomers has him missing the “fun part, the showing it.

“I’m constantly missing that.” he said. “The hobby will not survive if you do not have new people coming in.”

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Martha’s Vineyard News | A Cooke’s Garden – The Vineyard Gazette – Martha’s Vineyard News

In a quiet courtyard two blocks from Edgartown’s bustling Main street, a colonial garden is blooming under 21st-century skies.

Purple verbena blossoms dance in the breeze above raised beds of herbs and edible flowers outside the Cooke House, a 1742 home that formerly anchored the Martha’s Vineyard Museum.

Nancy Vietor spearheaded the fundraising campaign. Jeanna Shepard

“Each plant here was chosen for a reason,” said Nancy Vietor, a longtime Edgartown resident and passionate gardener, as she walked the courtyard’s gravel paths on a sunny September day.

Plants for cooking, dyeing fabrics and medicinal use are all a part of the colonial garden, said Nancy, who spearheaded the fundraising campaign to create a series of gardens on the Cooke House property after the museum moved to Vineyard Haven last year.

Tucked behind a fence at the rear of the house, the colonial garden also has a new shed to store tables, chairs and potting supplies, allowing for a panorama of craft and learning activities.

Nasturtiums and and other edible plants and herbs spill over containers in the colonial garden. Jeanna Shepard

“We can make wreaths, we can make sailors’ valentines, we can make bouquet garni,” Nancy said.

Still to come, she added, is a horse trough with a pump where children visiting the garden can pump water by hand, the old-fashioned way.

The oldest house in Edgartown still standing on its original site, the Cooke House is named for original owner Thomas Cooke, the town’s customs agent at a time when the harbor teemed with commerce.

in 1930, the Thomas Cooke House, built around 1742, was bequeathed to the Dukes County Historical Society by Miss Ethelinda Mayhew. Vineyard Gazette Archives

The museum, founded in 1922 as the Dukes County Historical Society, made the house at the corner of Cooke and School streets its headquarters from 1932 until last year’s move.

Buying and renovating the Vineyard Haven site, a former hospital for sailors built in 1895, was an expensive project and the museum no longer needed its Edgartown campus, so it sold some of the land along School street. Now, a newly-built house looms just over the fence.

Even more of the property might have been sold and developed, had it not been for Nancy’s determination not to let the current century overwhelm the historic Cooke House.

Her solution: Raise funds to not only keep the land, but transform the corner lot into an inviting resource for Islanders and visitors alike to learn more about the Vineyard’s natural and human history.

This was a tall order – about $1.5 million tall.

First, donors contributed $500,000 to protect the property from development and place it under permanent conservation restrictions.

The next challenge was how to handle the land itself, which sloped toward the house and leached water into the building.

The grounds around the house were regraded but the pagoda tree was protected with a new stone wall. Jeanna Shepard

Rather than raise the historic structure, contractors lowered the grade level around it by about two and a half feet – except for a wide circle around the Cooke House’s majestic pagoda tree.

Thought to have been planted as a cutting from the famous whaling-era pagoda tree on South Water street, the tree remains at the original grade level, surrounded by a low stone wall.

This fall, Nancy said, hundreds of daffodil bulbs will be planted at the base of the pagoda tree to bloom in a blaze of yellow next spring.

The pagoda tree garden and colonial garden are two in a series of Cooke House plantings envisioned as a “learning loop,” taking visitors from the Vineyard’s earliest landscapes to the present day.

A sand plain outwash garden, with little bluestem grass and other native plants, represents the Island of prehistoric times, complete with a glacial boulder. There’s also a grove of beetlebungs and a maple-shaded corner that, when completed, will provide a haven for the contemplative.

“It is going to be densely planted with thick, beautiful shrubs and lots of trees,” Nancy said. Already installed, wooden benches surround a planned millstone fountain at the garden’s center.

As part of the grading process, contractors also moved the property’s electrical systems underground.

“That was a huge expense,” Nancy said, but it means that no overhead lines will intrude on the view.

While the colonial garden is essentially completed, other elements of the plan – formally titled the Cooke House Legacy Gardens – are still underway, including an eight-foot square of granite that will be laser-etched with an 1850 birds-eye street map of the town.

The colonial garden was the first to be completed in a series of new gardens. Jeanna Shepard

While Nancy is heading the fundraising campaign, she emphasized that many other people have been working hard on the Cooke House project.

“Cheryl Doble really led it,” she said, also crediting Tim Boland, executive director of Polly Hill Arboretum, arborist Bob Hagerty and garden designer Lil Province. Landscape contractor Mark Crossland was one of the stars of the project, particularly when it came to saving the pagoda tree, Nancy added.

“He really broke his back over this,” she said.

While the gardens and house restoration continue, the Cooke House property is open to the public. Nancy also continues to seek donations for work still to be done, from a stand of medicinal shrubs to a perennial border along the edge of the property.

For more information about the Cooke House Legacy Gardens, or to make a donation, visit mvmuseum.org.


Louisa Hufstader is a reporter for the Vineyard Gazette.

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What’s happening today at the online Fall Dispatch Home & Garden Show – The Columbus Dispatch

The Columbus Dispatch

TODAY AT THE SHOW

For everyone’s safety, the Fall Dispatch Home & Garden Show will take place online this year.

That means you can get comfy at home and leisurely peruse the many events the show has to offer. The virtual event re-creates an expo hall with booths and an auditorium, each participating company is offering resources, and representatives will be available to talk with you online. Come and go as often as you like.

Location: DispatchHomeAndGardenShow.com

Admission: free

Hours: show opens today at 8 a.m. and “chats” are available through 8 p.m.

Special attractions: wholesale pricing on spring flowering bulbs, see Dutch Mill Greenhouse and get answers to your gardening questions from master gardeners.

Today’s workshops

Presenters will answer your questions through chat; check online for additional workshops.

11 a.m.: How much does a furnace/air conditioning system cost? Presented by Fire & Ice Heating and Air Conditioning.

Noon: Attracting birds and other wildlife to your backyard, presented by Tisa Watts, founder of the Columbus Garden School.

4: p.m.:Organizing made easy! Kitchen, bathroom and closets presented by ShelfGenie.

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Garden Club of Aiken’s holiday greenery sale is underway – Charleston Post Courier

Looking for some festive holiday decorations?

The Garden Club of Aiken is conducting a greenery sale for the second year in a row.

Plans call for $5,000 from the proceeds to be donated to the Friends of the Aiken County Public Library.

The money will be used to help fund new landscaping on the grounds of the library, which is undergoing a major renovation at 314 Chesterfield St. S.W.

The garden club has maintained the landscaping near the facility’s entrance for many years.

“The Friends of the Library are deeply grateful that Aiken’s oldest garden club will continue its historical connection by funding new landscaping through their Christmas greens sale,” said Friends President Bill Reynolds.

The rest of funds raised by the 2020 greenery sale will be returned to the community through the club’s various outreach programs.

Available for purchase from the club are small, medium and large wreaths, garlands, kissing balls, tabletop trees, table runners and hand-tied deep red velvet bows.

For more information about the holiday greenery sale or to place an order online, visit thegardenclubofaiken.com.

The deadline for orders is Oct. 24.

In addition, special order services are being offered for extra large wreaths, custom garlands and mailbox saddles.

To purchase those decorations, contact an Aiken Garden Club member or call Bonnie Coward at 803 215-1956 before Oct. 17.

Orders can be picked up from 2 to 4 p.m. on Dec. 1 at 1022 South Boundary Ave. S.E.

Claudia Lea Phelps, a member of Aiken’s Winter Colony, founded the Garden Club of Aiken in 1924.

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Oct 17 | Maricopa County Home and Garden Show | Phoenix, AZ Patch – Patch.com

The Maricopa County Home & Garden Show, the largest home show in the Southwest, makes its triumphant return to WestWorld of Scottsdale Friday, October 16 through Sunday, October 18 with fall-inspired indoor and outdoor decorating ideas to freshen up your home for the new season. The show features a variety of local small businesses, artisans and the best assortment of home improvement companies across the Valley.

The Home Show has created numerous safety measures and guidelines with an abundance of caution to ensure guests and exhibitors feel safe and secure, which include:

  • Wider aisles, enabling the practice of safe social distancing
  • Encouraging vendors and attendees to maintain safe social distance
  • Ensuring the availability of handwashing and sanitizing stations
  • Ensuring regular and thorough cleaning of the venue
  • Masks required at WestWorld of Scottsdale. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own or a complimentary disposable mask will be provided for them upon entry.

Visit MChomeshows.com for more Health & Safety details.

The Maricopa County Home & Garden Show, complete with hundreds of home improvement, design and landscaping products and services offered at exclusive Home Show pricing.

Unique Show Attractions (FREE with admission):

  • Handmade Headquarters: Sign up for FREE make-and-take crafts, including pumpkin chai bath bombs and botanical bath salts, Arizona fall and holiday themed crafts, DIY rubber ducky succulent terrariums, design your own wine cork keychain and more!
  • Home Décor and Curated Artisans: Shop handmade home décor, furniture, and exclusive one-of-a-kind holiday gifts for everyone on your list. Unique gifts include trendy wood plank signs, bath bombs, metal décor, chef inspired cutlery, delicious dips and sauces, abstract resin art, plus so much more!
  • Make Your Own Beeswax Candle: Buzz on over to the AZ Queen Bee booth to roll your own take-home beeswax candle. Sample her limited regional honey collected from Scottsdale hives, desert bloom and orange blossom honey along with tasty creamed & infused lemon, strawberry, chocolate, & blueberry honeys. While there, roll your own candle and shop adorable totes, honey jars, wooden dippers, reusable beeswax wraps and more!
  • Design Your Backyard Staycation: FREE walk-up landscape consultation and take-home design with the landscaping professionals at Horticultural Frontiers, a value of $350. Don’t forget to bring your existing backyard pictures and measurements.
  • Dog Tricks & Obedience Training Demo’s: Watch amazing tricks & demonstrations of basic to advanced obedience training from the skilled professionals at Dog Training Elite.

Friday, October 16 – Sunday, October 18

Friday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

WestWorld of Scottsdale

16601 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale AZ 85260

General Admission: $5 daily for adults, Children 12 and younger are free.

Senior Morning: Friday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., $2 admission for guests 60 and older.

Customer Appreciation: $2 admission Friday and Sunday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Military Appreciation: $2 admission with valid military identification all three days.

October Birthdays: Visit the info booth for a special gift with valid ID.

Sign up for discounted tickets at MChomeshows.com.

Parking & More: $10 for onsite parking cash only per the City of Scottsdale, enter at Bell and 94th Street or Pima Road and WestWorld Drive. Large food court and ATMs onsite for your convenience. *Note this is a cash only facility.

For more information about the Maricopa County Home Show, call 602.485.1691 ext. 4 or visit MChomeshows.com. Follow them on Facebook at facebook.com/HomeShows.

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Oct 16 | Maricopa County Home and Garden Show | Phoenix, AZ Patch – Patch.com

The Maricopa County Home & Garden Show, the largest home show in the Southwest, makes its triumphant return to WestWorld of Scottsdale Friday, October 16 through Sunday, October 18 with fall-inspired indoor and outdoor decorating ideas to freshen up your home for the new season. The show features a variety of local small businesses, artisans and the best assortment of home improvement companies across the Valley.

The Home Show has created numerous safety measures and guidelines with an abundance of caution to ensure guests and exhibitors feel safe and secure, which include:

  • Wider aisles, enabling the practice of safe social distancing
  • Encouraging vendors and attendees to maintain safe social distance
  • Ensuring the availability of handwashing and sanitizing stations
  • Ensuring regular and thorough cleaning of the venue
  • Masks required at WestWorld of Scottsdale. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own or a complimentary disposable mask will be provided for them upon entry.

Visit MChomeshows.com for more Health & Safety details.

The Maricopa County Home & Garden Show, complete with hundreds of home improvement, design and landscaping products and services offered at exclusive Home Show pricing.

Unique Show Attractions (FREE with admission):

  • Handmade Headquarters: Sign up for FREE make-and-take crafts, including pumpkin chai bath bombs and botanical bath salts, Arizona fall and holiday themed crafts, DIY rubber ducky succulent terrariums, design your own wine cork keychain and more!
  • Home Décor and Curated Artisans: Shop handmade home décor, furniture, and exclusive one-of-a-kind holiday gifts for everyone on your list. Unique gifts include trendy wood plank signs, bath bombs, metal décor, chef inspired cutlery, delicious dips and sauces, abstract resin art, plus so much more!
  • Make Your Own Beeswax Candle: Buzz on over to the AZ Queen Bee booth to roll your own take-home beeswax candle. Sample her limited regional honey collected from Scottsdale hives, desert bloom and orange blossom honey along with tasty creamed & infused lemon, strawberry, chocolate, & blueberry honeys. While there, roll your own candle and shop adorable totes, honey jars, wooden dippers, reusable beeswax wraps and more!
  • Design Your Backyard Staycation: FREE walk-up landscape consultation and take-home design with the landscaping professionals at Horticultural Frontiers, a value of $350. Don’t forget to bring your existing backyard pictures and measurements.
  • Dog Tricks & Obedience Training Demo’s: Watch amazing tricks & demonstrations of basic to advanced obedience training from the skilled professionals at Dog Training Elite.

Friday, October 16 – Sunday, October 18

Friday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

WestWorld of Scottsdale

16601 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale AZ 85260

General Admission: $5 daily for adults, Children 12 and younger are free.

Senior Morning: Friday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., $2 admission for guests 60 and older.

Customer Appreciation: $2 admission Friday and Sunday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Military Appreciation: $2 admission with valid military identification all three days.

October Birthdays: Visit the info booth for a special gift with valid ID.

Sign up for discounted tickets at MChomeshows.com.

Parking & More: $10 for onsite parking cash only per the City of Scottsdale, enter at Bell and 94th Street or Pima Road and WestWorld Drive. Large food court and ATMs onsite for your convenience. *Note this is a cash only facility.

For more information about the Maricopa County Home Show, call 602.485.1691 ext. 4 or visit MChomeshows.com. Follow them on Facebook at facebook.com/HomeShows.

Source

Home & Garden – Marin Independent Journal

Santa Fe habitat-certified garden inspires, sustains


After reading a recent fine living column that spotlighted the certified wildlife habitat garden of Novato resident Jeannette Derammelaere, Katherine vonRueden wanted to share her gorgeous 2020 habitat-certified garden with Marin readers. So, let’s take a virtual trip to Santa Fe and see how her garden grows there. When vonRueden and her husband, Justin Clemens, first met in 2009, they…

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